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2013-09-11 12.12.00The freesia is completed using a satin stitch.

Almost finished with the perfume related hexagons. The purpose for this project was to learn the making of perfume. Each hexagon pictures a flower, a resin, an animal, an herb or whatever is used in the making of perfume. Mostly DMC floss was used to develop a variety of embroidery stitches which include: cross-stitch, beading, redwork, shadow-work, blackwork and petit point to name a few.

 Freesia


Freesia

Modern perfumes are made using sythetic compounds. Chanel No5, L’Interdit, Arpege, Rive Gauche and White Linen are such scents.

A fresh Freesia flower produces a lovely scent, but does not hold its fragrance as a natural essence and is produced using chemical compounds.

This needlework utilizes the satin stitch and DMC cotton. This design illustrates the many colors you will see in the individual Freesia flower: white, pink, gold, yellow, and purple.

dandelionfloss

This bloodroot was a most exciting find. For some time I have been dyeing cotton, silk and linen (natural fibers) using berries, beets, onionskins, madder root, indigo, apple and pear tree barks, goldenrod, pomegranate seeds and rind, cochineal and tea leaves. These dyed fabrics were then made into small quilts that I use as demos for my lectures on Nature Dyed. When learning about natural dyes, I read about blootroot: a white wild flower that grows in the early spring and its roots contain a dye that will produce a red, orange, yellow or brown color. American Indians used this root for face paint. Until this week, I had not found this plant. It so happened that my husband was helping bring items up from the basement of our local Historical House in town to set up for a tag sale. Another helper mentioned that it was ‘bloodroot’ that was…

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Bloodroot

Bloodroot

This bloodroot was a most exciting find. For some time I have been dyeing cotton, silk and linen (natural fibers) using berries, beets, onionskins, madder root, indigo, apple and pear tree barks, goldenrod, pomegranate seeds and rind, cochineal and tea leaves. These dyed fabrics were then made into small quilts that I use as demos for my lectures on Nature Dyed. When learning about natural dyes, I read about blootroot: a white wild flower that grows in the early spring and its roots contain a dye that will produce a red, orange, yellow or brown color. American Indians used this root for face paint. Until this week, I had not found this plant. It so happened that my husband was helping bring items up from the basement of our local Historical House in town to set up for a tag sale. Another helper mentioned that it was ‘bloodroot’ that was growing at the basement entrance. My husband passed this info on to me as he remembered my quest (what a great guy!). With permission from the Historical Society’s president, I thinned out a few plants to add to my garden and to prepare this demo of BLOODROOT.

For over 10 years I kept a journal.  It was filed with mostly: complaining.  Morning pages are what they were called.  The first thing I would do when getting out of bed (besides…you know what) would be to pick up my fountain pen and marble note book.   I filled many note books and have collected lots of empty ink bottles.  For some reason I stopped writing.  Just like that.  Now I wake up and play with my iPhone: 7 Little Words, Scrabble, Facebook, Words w/friends and sometimes a decade of the rosary with my Rosary App. 

Almost a year ago I started this Blog.  Of course I was going to write regularly and develop better writing skills.  So why haven’t I been Blogging? 

JUST DO IT….NOW!  is a favorite motto for me.  It is very helpful: like when I need to clean the bathroom or to do some other chore I don’t like.  I have these words posted by the kitchen sink.  Now that I have said that, maybe when I see my sign, it will remind me to get on to the computer to write.  How will the writing skills get better if I don’t write?

Young Meadows

Young meadows
Hastening their green laps
To fill with golden dandelion and daffodils:
These are fit sights for Spring.
Clarence Chatham Cook

DSCN0178Over time I am developing a series of needle-arts using the ‘fig’ as motif: Fancywork with Fig.  This Indian Fig Cacti is adapted from a quilt pattern.  Instead of using fabrics for the shapes, I used DMC flosses and embroidery and crewel stitches.  This ‘Fancywork with Fig’ series  will develop aspects of the fig using the many needle work techniques: ribbonwork, blackwork, needlepoint, beading, embroidery, crewel, tambour, whitework, etc.  We have many references of the fig in the Bible: fig leaves, the Banyan and Sycamore (fig trees); then we have the fig wasp, figwort flowers, Edward’s Fig Parrot, the fig bettle and more to learn about the fig.

The interest of the fig came to me after reading the book: The Fig Eater by Jody Shields.  The story takes place in Vienna.  A young girl is found dead with a fig enlarged in her throat.  As the plot develops one learns much about the fig.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indian Fig is a needle work using a variety of stitches and DMC floss.  It is part of a series: Fancywork with Fig.  This series will focus on  crewel, embroidery, beading, ribbonwork, stumpwork, blackwork, etc.  This particular piece is adapted from a quilt pattern, but instead of using fabric multiple crewel and embroidery stitches were used.

What I am also doing here, is learning the up loading of pictures to my blog.