2013-09-11 12.12.00The freesia is completed using a satin stitch.

Almost finished with the perfume related hexagons. The purpose for this project was to learn the making of perfume. Each hexagon pictures a flower, a resin, an animal, an herb or whatever is used in the making of perfume. Mostly DMC floss was used to develop a variety of embroidery stitches which include: cross-stitch, beading, redwork, shadow-work, blackwork and petit point to name a few.

Advertisements
 Freesia


Freesia

Modern perfumes are made using sythetic compounds. Chanel No5, L’Interdit, Arpege, Rive Gauche and White Linen are such scents.

A fresh Freesia flower produces a lovely scent, but does not hold its fragrance as a natural essence and is produced using chemical compounds.

This needlework utilizes the satin stitch and DMC cotton. This design illustrates the many colors you will see in the individual Freesia flower: white, pink, gold, yellow, and purple.

Design components

Design components

Remember the movie Working Girl? Melanie Griffith (Tess McGill) puts forward her own idea for a merger deal, but Sigourney Weaver (Katerine Parker) takes all the credit. Luck for Tess is that she has kept all her papers and can document that it is her information and not Katherine’s that helps seal the deal.
When you write you are told to establish Copyright for your work. But how do you establish authority for your needle-art projects? Can someone come along and take credit for what you have designed? With a camera and your computer it is easy to document your work.
I’m just having fun here: pretending that my creation will actually be meaningful, and maybe someone will steal my idea. The image pictured here is the start of documentation for a piece that I will include in my ‘perfume alphabet’ (mentioned in an earlier blog). This is a freesia flower design (copyright free from Dover Press) I have selected; the transfer of this design onto a linen material; the photo from an encyclopedia used for colour reference; and the DMC threads that will be used to create the stitches.
The next step, is to select the type of embroidery stitches…or beading…or sequins. Sometimes it is the HOW rather than the WHAT that is difficult!

The Pawling Free Library offered a workshop hosted by Jan Kardys, a literary agent. Her main objective was to advertise The Unicorn Writers’ Conference that will be held March 22, 2014 at Saint Clements Castle in Portland, CT. She offered so much more.
Thirty or more people attended. She radiated enthusiasm and sparkle throughout the room. Besides verbal, computer screen, and visual signage information within her lecture space, she supplied many handouts offering info on copyrights, book proposals, permissions, website design and query letters to name just a few.
There is this person inside me that wants to write for publication. What to write about? Who will want to read it? Where to publish what has been written? How to present the information?
It was fun to attend this lecture. It reminded me of when I worked as a librarian. We were regularly given opportunity to attend workshops. We would learn about the latest information sources in order to enhance our research skills to assist our patrons. In the beginning, it was reference books, databases, and info-trac. Then the internet. When the internet became the ‘go-to’ we learned the reputable sites in all the genres. Since there is much too much information on the internet, I am pleased to have Jan’s hand-outs that provide the information needed to help me move to the goal of publication.
Thank you Jan for re-igniting my ‘desire for writing’ ember!

Always check your spelling. Jan’s #1 rule!

dandelionfloss

This bloodroot was a most exciting find. For some time I have been dyeing cotton, silk and linen (natural fibers) using berries, beets, onionskins, madder root, indigo, apple and pear tree barks, goldenrod, pomegranate seeds and rind, cochineal and tea leaves. These dyed fabrics were then made into small quilts that I use as demos for my lectures on Nature Dyed. When learning about natural dyes, I read about blootroot: a white wild flower that grows in the early spring and its roots contain a dye that will produce a red, orange, yellow or brown color. American Indians used this root for face paint. Until this week, I had not found this plant. It so happened that my husband was helping bring items up from the basement of our local Historical House in town to set up for a tag sale. Another helper mentioned that it was ‘bloodroot’ that was…

View original post 47 more words

Bloodroot

Bloodroot

This bloodroot was a most exciting find. For some time I have been dyeing cotton, silk and linen (natural fibers) using berries, beets, onionskins, madder root, indigo, apple and pear tree barks, goldenrod, pomegranate seeds and rind, cochineal and tea leaves. These dyed fabrics were then made into small quilts that I use as demos for my lectures on Nature Dyed. When learning about natural dyes, I read about blootroot: a white wild flower that grows in the early spring and its roots contain a dye that will produce a red, orange, yellow or brown color. American Indians used this root for face paint. Until this week, I had not found this plant. It so happened that my husband was helping bring items up from the basement of our local Historical House in town to set up for a tag sale. Another helper mentioned that it was ‘bloodroot’ that was growing at the basement entrance. My husband passed this info on to me as he remembered my quest (what a great guy!). With permission from the Historical Society’s president, I thinned out a few plants to add to my garden and to prepare this demo of BLOODROOT.

For over 10 years I kept a journal.  It was filed with mostly: complaining.  Morning pages are what they were called.  The first thing I would do when getting out of bed (besides…you know what) would be to pick up my fountain pen and marble note book.   I filled many note books and have collected lots of empty ink bottles.  For some reason I stopped writing.  Just like that.  Now I wake up and play with my iPhone: 7 Little Words, Scrabble, Facebook, Words w/friends and sometimes a decade of the rosary with my Rosary App. 

Almost a year ago I started this Blog.  Of course I was going to write regularly and develop better writing skills.  So why haven’t I been Blogging? 

JUST DO IT….NOW!  is a favorite motto for me.  It is very helpful: like when I need to clean the bathroom or to do some other chore I don’t like.  I have these words posted by the kitchen sink.  Now that I have said that, maybe when I see my sign, it will remind me to get on to the computer to write.  How will the writing skills get better if I don’t write?